November 2019 Journeys: Challah Fights Hunger on Campus, Jewish Vet Takes on New Mission and More

November 2019 Journeys: Challah Fights Hunger on Campus, Jewish Vet Takes on New Mission and More

Posted on November 14, 2019

Contact:

Julie Livingston [email protected]
Candace Gaswirth [email protected]

Challah Fights Hunger on Campus, Jewish Vet Takes on New Mission and More

November Issue of Journeys

In the November issue of Journeys, USCJ’s monthly digital magazine, timely articles illuminate the meaning of authentic Jewish journey, both spiritual and person. Following are highlights:

Challah Fights Hunger on Campus

Challah for Hunger leverages the age old tradition of baking challah. Last year the initiative raised $165,000 and distributed 31,000 loaves of bread, helping more than half of all four-year university and community college students who are considered “food insecure.”

One Woman Tests Her Tanach (the Hebrew Bible)

College freshman Elianna Sokoler of Temple Aliyah in California shares her story about competing in the International Chidon HaTanach, a global competition held in Jerusalem that brings together 72 participants from more than 40 countries.

Jewish Veteran Takes on New Mission

Ellis Corbets, 88, started the Amereican Jewish War Heroes Yahrzeit Program to document Jewish service members who were either killed in the line of duty or missing in action (M.I.A.) during World Wars I and II or M.I.A. in the Korean and Vietnam Wars. Each of the more than 3,650 Jewish service members collected so far share the distinction of being buried or memorialized overseas.

Masorti Offers a Compassionate Conversion Alternative in Israel

Conversion to Judaism through the Israeli Masorti Movement has become a choice for many. While the State of Israel recognizes Masorti conversions for the purpose of citizenship, the Orthodox Rabbinate does not.

How My Mother’s Illness Lead to My Inclusion Journey

Charged with caring for her five-year-old grandson with special needs, Zelene Lovitt, who was born into the world of inclusion through her mother, a victim of polio, shares her personal journey.

The November issue in its entirety can be found at https://journeys.uscj.org/.